Meeting Point: Latest From Lovaas

Fall 2010

Meeting Point: Latest From Lovaas

In This Issue

Q&A: Swallowing Pills

I am working with a 6-year-old student who has been receiving ABA services for almost 3 years. "Andrew" is able to speak in single-word responses, is learning beginning abstract concepts such as colors, and is learning some beginning interactive play skills...

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Turkey Pumpkin Craft Project

Here's a craft project that parents or instructors can do with children at any age or skill level. Most of the supplies you may already have on hand.

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Case Study: Michael

When Michael was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder just before his third birthday, his parents were "sent on an emotional rollercoaster ride." He had received speech, occupational, and developmental therapies since the age of two through the state's early intervention system because he was not talking.

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Special Features

When asked what he was going to be for Halloween, Isaiah, 5 years old, replied that he was going to be, "a shirt and a pants," in reference to the fact that he was going to dress up as a football player by wearing a jersey and football pants.
-San Diego

When practicing food tolerance, Bobby was asked to select the reinforcer for which he would be working. He requested "a cupcake with no medicine in it," as his parents typically placed his vitamins and other medications inside of a preferred food such as a cupcake.
-San Diego

Peter has been quite a gentleman. I told him today to remember not to kiss me (on the hand) at school. He said, "But you are so beautiful!"
-New Jersey

During a grammar lesson in his regular education first grade classroom, Henry proudly raised his hand to fix an error on the whiteboard. He identified a letter that was incorrectly capitalized in the middle of a sentence. When asked to explain his answer, he said, "That's supposed to be shortalized."
-New Jersey

The names of all children in this newsletter have been changed in respect for family confidentiality.


Big Bear Wants In! Put stuffed animals down the back of the child's shirt, up the pants leg, in the sleeves.

The Big Spin! Pick the child up by the armpits for a big spin (don't fall over!).

Pump Me Up! Say, "It's time to pump me up!" Mimic two- handed bicycle pump while inflating your cheeks. Now you can't talk, but hold the child's hands and have them POP your mouth. You can also mime inflating your entire body by slowly lifting up onto your toes, and expanding your arms and stomach (in rhythm with the child's pumping action).

Train Ride! Line up the chairs, one behind the other and go for a train ride. Who's the engineer? Who's in the caboose?

Go Swimming! Manipulate the child's arms and legs so they are "swimming" or doing a "cheer."