Meeting Point: Latest From Lovaas

September 07

Meeting Point: Latest From Lovaas

From the Editor

Here again are some of the letters to the editor we have received recently. We will continue to take your requests into consideration when planning future articles. If you have insight into any of the requests, based on your own experience, feel free to forward your comments to us as well. I look forward to continuing our discussion next month. Again, on one hand, we want the information to be specific enough to serve as practical suggestions for others. On the other hand, no article can summarize the nuances involved in adapting a suggestion to every particular child. We'll keep trying to strike an effective balance. Continue to let us know how we're doing and on what specifically you would like more information. I look forward to continuing our discussion next month.

Sincerely,

Vincent J. LaMarca
Editor, Lovaas Institute Newsletter

IEP's

I am having more testing done with my child before we go on to complete her IEP. Her speech, sensory, and behavioral is the key we have to work with. I would like to know more about the aide coming to the home and how you go about that.

- Ohio

IEP's

I have two autistic sons, seven and eight years old. We have relocated to another district, so I am very concerned about transitioning, IEP team members and so forth. I have struggled with our System, but have managed after a few years to get educated and advocate for my children.

- Hawaii

IEP's

I have been fighting for my son to get an IEP for two years. His behavior at school is defiant and violent. He has always been a challenging child at home, but his home problems were never to the extent that we see at his school. We've tried a different school, but it didn't help his problem. We finally got in to see a psychiatrist who said he had PDD-NOS, which has made the school district finally consent to an IEP. But, as the least educated member of the IEP team, I'm at a loss as to what needs to be on his IEP.

- California

Teens with Autism

I am tired of hearing about young children with autism. What about when these young children become teenagers? My son is 13 and struggles with knowing that he is different, bullying, friendships and just plain growing up a teenager.

- Pennsylvania

Charter Schools

I'm wondering about charter schools. My son has Asperger's, is emotionally way behind his peers, failing in most of his subjects, failed the standardized tests which must be passed in order to graduate, and has no friends. The classes are too big for much 1:1 assistance even though his current teachers are pretty good. I've heard some good things about charter schools with them having a smaller student-teacher ratio, having a similar student population so that teasing and bullying would be minimized, much more 1:1 assistance, and having the benefit of being a public school rather than private. Also, due to the populations served, I would imagine that the faculty would be more open in their IEP's. The downside is driving distance to and from school and the "lottery" method of gaining acceptance into one of these schools. My son is coming to the end of his 5th grade year and I'm feeling the need for something more supportive to his needs by 7th grade when middle school (and all of those hormones) starts. What are your thoughts about this?

- Indiana




Email A Friend

* Your information will not be shared with anyone. Ever. Thank you!